More than 80 percent of hospitalised patients have these surprising coronavirus symptoms

Coronavirus appears to be on the ascendance across the UK, heaping pressure on the government to take a tougher line. Sunday saw a jump in the number of people admitted to hospital with COVID-19. There were 478 people admitted to hospital on Sunday – the largest daily figure since early June – up from 386.

The high-alert situation is a grave cause for concern but the UK is more equipped to neutralise the threat than it was back in March.

A number of antiviral drugs have been shown to reduce the death toll by up to a third in severe cases.

What’s more, a succession of studies have furthered our understanding about the numerous ways COVID-19 can affect the body.

The latter findings are significant because they provide the general public with tools of awareness.

A new study adds to the existing literature, revealing the most prevalent symptoms in hospitalised cases.

Researchers from the Northwestern Memorial Hospital in Chicago have found the majority of hospitalised coronavirus patients suffer neurological symptoms.

Researchers looked at more than 500 patients with COVID-19 at 10 hospitals for neurological symptoms.

Researchers found more than 80 percent experience headaches, dizziness, muscle pain, encephalopathy also known as altered mental function.

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The most common symptoms were muscle pain and headaches, with 45 percent and 38 percent having them, respectively.

The study also showed that 42 percent had neurological symptoms when their symptoms began and 63 percent suffered them while in the hospital.

Significantly, 82 percent said they experienced at least one symptom during the course of their illness.

Nearly one-third of patients experienced encephalopathy, which is an altered mental state leaving them confused.

What’s more, patients with encephalopathy had an average hospital stay that was three times longer and a death risk seven times higher, the team discovered.

Furthermore, around 16 percent had taste symptoms and 11 percent reported smell issues.

The NHS highlights loss of smell and/or taste as one of the main symptoms.

The health body has not updated its list, despite emerging evidence such as this study, which has found other symptoms to be equally if not more prevalent.

According to the researchers, the study first of its kind in the US and could help identify and treat people hospitalised with COVID-19 before experiencing such symptoms.

How to respond to symptoms

According to the NHS, if you have any of the main symptoms of coronavirus (COVID-19), get a test as soon as possible.

You are also instructed to stay at home until you get the result, says the health body.

“Anyone you live with, and anyone in your support bubble, must also stay at home until you get your result,” it adds.

According to the researchers, the study first of its kind in the US and could help identify and treat people hospitalised with COVID-19 before experiencing such symptoms.

How to respond to symptoms

According to the NHS, if you have any of the main symptoms of coronavirus (COVID-19), get a test as soon as possible.

You are also instructed to stay at home until you get the result, says the health body.

“Anyone you live with, and anyone in your support bubble, must also stay at home until you get your result,” it adds.

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